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358 results for pale of settlement
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ARTICLE: Nemyriv

After the civil war, the Jewish population of Nemirov was bolstered by the arrival of refugees from neighboring settlements, reaching 4,176 in 1926. In 1923–1924, Jews formed three agricultural

ARTICLE: Soviet Yiddish-Language Schools

In smaller settlements, Yiddish schools were closed for lack of enrollment. Minority schools for ethnic groups that had their own country or having most of their populations living outside the

ARTICLE: Steinberg Brothers

moral and political grounds, Steinberg believed that the salvation of the Jewish people lay in autonomous Yiddish-speaking agricultural settlements under the political patronage of colonial empires

ARTICLE: Rabbinate: The Rabbinate before 1800

In the thirteenth century, few Jewish settlements seem to have been in a position to communities in Moravia, however, meant that many Jewish settlements did not employ their own rabbi, a phenomenon

ARTICLE: Councils

assumed responsibility for all the other Jewish settlements in the region, particularly with regard to For this reason, an increasing number of settlements sought the status of leading community and

ARTICLE: Pinsk

of “Lite” (Jewish Lithuania), extending its authority over at least 26 smaller Jewish settlements from the mid-sixteenth century until the abolition of Polish–Lithuanian Jewish autonomy in 1764

ARTICLE: Hungary: Hungary since 1945

In 2000, Jewish communities in 26 settlements were organized. The first Reform community—Sim Shalom—was founded in Budapest in 1992. The Lubavitch movement has created its institutions, too,

ARTICLE: Tombstones

as Eastern Europe are from third- and fourth-century Roman Pannonia, from the settlements of Solva (today’s Esztergom, Hungary), Aquincum (Buda, Hungary), Intercisa (Dunaújváros, Hungary), Siklós (

ARTICLE: Asch, Sholem

the conference, Peretz, Asch, Reyzen, and Nomberg toured a number of East European Jewish settlements, seeking support for a program to develop Yiddish into a literary, scientific, and national

ARTICLE: Legal Institutions

The courts lacked even equitable authority in most matters; their rulings were reduced to settlements based on compromise, subject to the acceptance of both parties. Wide swaths of Jewish law became

ARTICLE: Rabbinic Literature: Rabbinic Literature after 1800

New practical questions emerged as well, most famously on the status of sabbatical-year produce from the agricultural settlements of the early Zionists. In the modern period, Jews also began serving

ARTICLE: Antisemitic Parties and Movements

Radical, xenophobic, and antisemitic right-wing parties that supported revision of the postwar peace settlements dominated the political scene. In November 1924, radical politicians established the

ARTICLE: Language: Yiddish

of speakers, numbering millions by the nineteenth century, and usually concentrated in compact settlements, combined with other factors to facilitate substantial growth of the language and its

ARTICLE: Romania

In 1882, some 228 Romanian Jews embarked from Galați and set up farming settlements in northern Palestine at Zikhron Ya‘akov and Rosh Pinah. The leaders of the first Zionist groups in Romania were

ARTICLE: Orshanskii, Il’ia Grigor’evich

Benjamin Nathans, Beyond the Pale: The Jewish Encounter with Late Imperial Russia (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 2002). (1846–1875), lawyer, historian, and publisher. Il’ia Orshanskii was born into a

ARTICLE: Landau, Adolph

Evreiskogo universiteta v Moskve 2 (1993): 149–173; 3 (1993): 183–212; Benjamin Nathans, Beyond the Pale: The Jewish Encounter with Late Imperial Russia (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 2002); Yehuda

ARTICLE: Kremer, Arkadii

and ed. Samuel A. Portnoy (New York, 1979); Ezra Mendelsohn, Class Struggle in the Pale: The Formative Years of the Jewish Workers’ Movement in Tsarist Russia (Cambridge, 1970); Moshe Mishkinsky, “

ARTICLE: Gozhansky, Shmul

New York, 1956–1968); Ezra Mendelsohn, Class Struggle in the Pale: The Formative Years of the Jewish Workers’ Movement in Tsarist Russia (Cambridge, 1970); Beynish Mikhalevitsh (Yoysef Izbitski), “

358 results for pale of settlement
More results: « | | 281-300 | 301-320 | 321-340 | 341-358