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ARTICLE: Yeshiva

is divided into two articles, one treating the yeshiva in the period before 1800 and the other here, see the entries on the individual Lithuanian yeshivas (for example, Ponevezh, Yeshiva of)


ARTICLE: Telz, Yeshiva of

The yeshiva of the Lithuanian town of Telsiai—or Telz, as it was known among Jews—had its beginnings as an initiative of some local scholars around 1870, but it became an institution of major significance when Eli‘ezer Gordon was appointed rabbi of Telz in 1883 and took over the direction of the yeshiva

ARTICLE: Volozhin, Yeshiva of

Valozhyn) yeshiva was the most important institution Events at the yeshiva were followed with great interest , the tsarist government pressed the yeshiva to introduce secular studies, especially in

ARTICLE: Mir, Yeshiva of

The Mir yeshiva was founded in 1815 by a wealthy householder, Shemu’el Tiktinski. Yehudah Finkel, son of the prominent Musar figure and founder of the Slobodka yeshiva, Natan Tsevi Finkel

ARTICLE: Slobodka, Yeshiva of

Natan Tsevi Finkel founded a novel type of yeshiva in Slobodka, a suburb of Kovno. Students were sent from the yeshiva in Kovno to the new yeshivas to serve as a core group, and start-up funds were given to the leaders of the new yeshivas

ARTICLE: Ponevezh, Yeshiva of

The Ponevezh yeshiva was founded by Yitsḥak Ya‘akov Rabinovich (Reb Itsele Ponevezher; 1854–1919) in 1908 in The yeshiva incorporated the study of musar, but the curriculum concentrated on Talmud

ARTICLE: Kol Ya‘akov Yeshiva

and in January 1957 the Kol Ya‘akov Yeshiva began operating on the precincts of the Mordechai Altshuler, “Ten Years of the Yeshiva in Soviet Moscow, 1955–1965, Jews in Russia and Eastern Europe 1 [50] (Summer 2003): 33–60; Avraham Greenbaum, “The Moscow Yeshiva,” Jews and Jewish Topics in the

ARTICLE: Yeshiva: The Yeshiva after 1800

With the decline of the yeshiva as an institution, by the nineteenth century the traditional East European Jewish locale for full-time advanced study of Talmud by youths and young men (unmarried or

ARTICLE: Yeshiva: The Yeshiva before 1800

The yeshiva in Eastern Europe in the early modern period ”trained young men to study formative texts and traditions, especially the Babylonian Talmud, the commentaries on it, and the legal decisions

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Students from the Mir Yeshiva, 1938.

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Students of the Telz yeshiva, 1938.

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A classroom at the Slonimer yeshiva, Vilna, 1930s. Photograph by A. Sapir.

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Young men studying at Ramayles’ Yeshiva, Vilna, 1930s. Photograph by A. Sapir.

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Photomontage of portraits of rabbis and students of the Yeshiva of Slobodka, near Kaunas, Lithuania, 1922.

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Portraits of the students and faculty of the Torat Ḥesed yeshiva, Brest (then Brześć nad Bugiem, Pol.; now in Bel.), Top center) Rabbi Ḥayim Halevi, founder of the yeshiva. Photograph by Foto

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Rabbi Peysekh Golezynski, head of the Łomża Yeshiva from ca. 1885 until 1920, Łomża, 1923.

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The students, faculty, and building of the ‘Ets Ḥayim Yeshiva, Kleck, Poland (now Kletsk, Bel.), 1938. Photograph by Kurnos.

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Students and staff of the Lida Yeshiva, established by Yitsḥak Ya‘akov Reines in Lida, Russia (now in Belarus), ca. 1905.

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Students at the yeshiva established by Mosheh Sofer in 1806, Bratislava, 1907. Many became well-known religious leaders later in life.

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Students and/or instructors from the Ponevezh yeshiva, Ponevezh (now Panevėžys, Lith.), 1914. The Hebrew inscription at the lower left says, “1855 years of exile.”

382 results for yeshiva
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